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Friday, 15 February 2013

Oxenhope turbine refused permission

A planning application for a small wind turbine at Bodkin Lane, Oxenhope has been refused by Bradford MDC.  Three reasons are given, the first being that "The proposed development would introduce an incongruous and widely visible vertical element into this sensitive upland landscape within the Worth Valley, whose historical and literary associations are also central to its wider economic value in tourism terms.  The proposed turbine would be seen from a number of vantage points and would result in significant harm to the character of the landscape that would outweigh its limited contribution towards overall renewable energy targets......"
This is just what campaigners connected to the Brontë Society have been saying in objections over the last year.  Ironically, this is one turbine which was not mentioned by the Society. Meanwhile, the really gigantic ones have got the go-ahead.


UPDATE 28 MARCH 2013 : PLANNING  PERMISSION FOR THREE WIND TURBINES OVERLOOKING PENISTONE HILL IS REFUSED

In January of this year a planning application to erect three micro-scale wind turbines in Oxenhope parish was submitted to Bradford Metropolitan District Council.  Because of the location of the proposed turbines which, close to Penistone Hill, would have been clearly visible numerous vantage points, the Brontë Society submitted an objection to Bradford Metropolitan District Council in accordance with our Heritage & Conservation Policy.

I am pleased to report that planning permission for the turbines has been refused on the grounds that the development would introduce ‘incongruous’ structures into ‘this sensitive rural landscape whose historical and literary associations are also central to its wider economic value in tourist terms.  The proposed turbines would be seen from vantage points and public rights of way over a wide area and would result in significant harm to the character of the landscape that would outweigh the limited contribution towards overall renewable energy targets.’  A further reason for refusal was that the turbines would be ‘an encroachment of inappropriate  development into the Green Belt that would have a harmful effect on the openness of the Green Belt’ and, again, it was felt that the negative impact outweighed the benefits as a source of renewable energy.

This is the third such planning application which has been refused by Bradford MDC on these grounds and it is very gratifying to know that the value of this unique heritage landscape has been recognised in the planning process.

Christine Went
Heritage and Conservation Officer

3 comments:

  1. How strange! Perhaps it depends who is asking for permission.

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  2. Your readers may be interested in an article that appeared in the 'Telegraph and Argus' today saying that the Bronte birthplace has once again changed hands. A private buyer has purchased the property at a cost of £120,000

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  3. On receipt of the monthly magazine 'The Dalesman' it was interesting to read about a Bronte connection.An article by former editor Bill Mitchell told how he had met a niece of the local composer Handel Parker who had strong connections with Haworth.Apparently the niece believed that Patrick Bronte had conducted the marriage ceremony of her grandparents and that she was told that Charlotte Bronte called at the Parker home to play the harmonium. ( Do we know if C played the piano?) Handel Parker's famous hymn tune 'Deep Harmony' was composed six years after the last Bronte died.

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